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Rachel Brice on Tribal Fusion

Rachel Brice TeachingGotta love it:

“There are very few rules in Tribal Fusion, but in my humble opinion the one constant is that the dancer or group is versed in American Tribal Style as taught by Carolena Nericcio. Her stylistic approach to existing vocabulary, her theatrical approach to costuming, and the incredible invention of group improvisation, has allowed infinite variations that all have one thing in common: powerful presentation. The strength that American Tribal Style communicates through its posture, arm placement, and costuming was a revelation for me as a feminist. Without Fat Chance, I can honestly say I wouldn’t be dancing today.”

-Rachel Brice
Full article below

— “Tribal Fusion Bellydance” — on www.rachelbrice.com —

“Tribal Fusion Belly Dance (or Bitter Oriental as I’ve become fond of calling it), is an ecclectic dance form that includes a multitude of influences. Belly Dance, Flamenco, Hip Hop, Jazz, Classical and other forms can be included into it’s stylistic vocabulary. Each group and even each dancer is a unique expression of the style. At this point in its life there is no real common base vocabulary , but I think it’s safe to say that every TFBD dancer is influenced by the combined vocabularies of Carolena Nericcio and Fat Chance Belly Dance, the creators of American Tribal Style, and Jamila Salmipour (Carolena’s teacher’s teacher), whether they know it or not.

The form is erroneously credited to yours truly, Rachel Brice, who merely popularized a version of it through years of intense touring with the Bellydance Superstars and the collective, The Indigo Belly Dance. The real dance heroes that created and fed my personal dance lineage: Jamila Salimpour taught John Compton and Masha Archer, who taught Carolena Nericcio, who who taught Jill Parker, who taught Heather Stants, who taught Mardi Love, who all taught me. Also hugely instrumental to the style is Suhaila Salimpour, Jamila’s daughter, whose ground-breaking approach to Belly Dance is largely responsible for the technique of most Tribal Fusion Belly Dancers.

 

There are very few rules in Tribal Fusion, but in my humble opinion the one constant is that the dancer or group is versed in American Tribal Style as taught by Carolena Nericcio. Her stylistic approach to existing vocabulary, her theatrical approach to costuming, and the incredible invention of group improvisation, has allowed infinite variations that all have one thing in common: powerful presentation. The strength that American Tribal Style communicates through its posture, arm placement, and costuming was a revelation for me as a feminist. Without Fat Chance, I can honestly say I wouldn’t be dancing today.

 

There is a huge list of other artists: costumers, musicians, actors, photographers, etc. that have influenced the style, and I’ll try to cover most of them here. If I can take credit for anything, it would be a love of teaching and learning, and an obsession with collages. Heather Stants credits me as the “adoptive mother” of the form, which, now adopted by thousands, continues to grow and change, and each year brings a new level of creativity, excitement, physicality, and beauty to our community.

 

Einstein jokingly said: “The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources.” Well, Einey, for me, the secret to creativity and a happy heart can be found in discovering new work, supporting other artists by sharing their work with others, cultivating curiosity, and infectious enthusiasm.”

From http://www.rachelbrice.com/

Shay
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Shay Moore is the director and primary instructor at Deep Roots Dance in Seattle, WA. She loves writing, movies, costuming, knitting, cooking, and bellydance to the moon and back again; and loves her amazing husband and doggies even more than that.

Shay
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